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Similarly, juries are routinely cautioned by courts and some attorneys not to allow sympathy for a party or other affected persons to compromise the fair and dispassionate evaluation of evidence.

These instructions are criticized by advocates of jury nullification.

A jury can similarly convict a defendant on the ground of disagreement with an existing law, even if no law is broken (although in jurisdictions with double jeopardy rules, a conviction can be overturned on appeal, but an acquittal cannot).

A jury verdict that is contrary to the letter of the law pertains only to the particular case before it.

In the past, it was feared that a single judge or panel of government officials might be unduly influenced to follow established legal practice, even when that practice had drifted from its origins.

In most modern Western legal systems, however, judges often instruct juries to act only as "finders of facts", whose role it is to determine the veracity of the evidence presented, the weight accorded to the evidence, to apply that evidence to the law as explained by the judge, and to reach a verdict; but not to question the law or decide what it says.

As an alternative, the USCIS may request for additional information or called Request For Evidence (RFE), by sending you a form I-797 and a list of information and documents it needs to determine your eligibility.

The petitioner may have certain days indicated in the RFE notice to respond the requests in the RFE notice.The federal rules of practice and procedure govern litigation in the federal courts.This site provides access to the federal rules and forms in effect, information on the rulemaking process (including proposed and pending rules amendments), and historical and archival records.Jury nullification is a concept where members of a trial jury can vote a defendant not guilty if they do not support a government's law, do not believe it is constitutional or humane, or do not support a possible punishment for breaking a government's law. In a criminal trial, a jury nullifies by acquitting a defendant, even though the members of the jury may believe that the defendant did the act the government considers illegal.This may occur when members of the jury disagree with the law the defendant has been charged with breaking, or believe that the law should not be applied in that particular case.