Radioactive dating lava

27 Jun

It has become increasingly clear that these radiometric dating techniques agree with each other and as a whole, present a coherent picture in which the Earth was created a very long time ago.Further evidence comes from the complete agreement between radiometric dates and other dating methods such as counting tree rings or glacier ice core layers.But there are some questions that come to mind: Calculus students typically meet this problem somewhere in the second semester.

There are over forty such techniques, each using a different radioactive element or a different way of measuring them.

We are told that of all the radiometric dates that are measured, only a few percent are anomalous.

This gives us the impression that all but a small percentage of the dates computed by radiometric methods agree with the assumed ages of the rocks in which they are found, and that all of these various methods almost always give ages that agree with each other to within a few percentage points.

Imagine we have an undiscovered element, Parentium, that has a radioactive isotope, Parentium-123, which decays to stable Daughterium-123.

This is the only way Parentium-123 decays, and there is no other source of Daughterium-123.