Teen dating vioence

20 May

In most cases of TDV, violence is used to get another to do what he/she wants, to gain power and control, to cause humiliation and to promote fear, and to retaliate against a partner (Foshee & Langwick, 2010).

An article published by the National Institute of Justice discusses current research on TDV and concludes that there are three key differences between adult and teen dating relationships: Because the dynamics of intimate partner abuse are different in adolescent and adult relationships, it is important not to apply an adult framework of intimate partner violence to teen dating violence. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reject the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

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Teen dating violence is defined as a pattern of actual or threatened acts of physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse, perpetrated by an adolescent (between the ages of 13 and 18) against a current or former dating partner.

Abuse may include insults, coercion, social sabotage, sexual harassment, threats and/or acts of physical or sexual abuse.

The abusive teen uses this pattern of violent and coercive behavior, in a heterosexual or same gender dating relationship, in order to gain power and maintain control over the dating partner. No boyfriend or girlfriend has the right to tell you what you can or should do, what you can or should wear, or what kind of friends you should have.

If you're in a dating relationship that in any way feels uncomfortable, awkward, tense or even frightening, trust your feelings and get out of it. Dating violence includes any behavior by a dating partner that: Teen dating violence is a pattern of abusive behaviors that are used to gain power and control over a current or former dating partner. Some examples are listed for each type, but other abusive or coercive behaviors that are done with the intent of controlling the partner would also be considered dating violence.

Adolescents who have grown up in violent homes are at risk of recreating the abusive relationships they have seen.

The following resources help to equip child welfare professionals with information on how to prevent and respond to teen dating violence.

The Date Safe Project Provides schools, students, and parents with educational resources to help address teen dating and sexual assault awareness in the community.

Violent words and actions are tools an abusive partner uses to gain and maintain power and control over their partner.

Any young person can experience dating abuse or unhealthy relationship behaviors, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic standing, ethnicity, religion or culture. metro area who need legal help, please contact Break the Cycle's legal services team.